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    Equipment


    *************UPDATED NOVEMBER 2009****************


    NEW! Check what’s in all my bike bags/panniers!

    The Koga Miyata - strong and comfy...

    Bicycle gear

    Camping gear

    Electronics

    Personal stuff

    Clothing

    Toolkit

    Miscellaneous


    *************UPDATED AUGUST 2009****************

    After more than 55.000 km (3.635 km pre-WT in Morocco and Tenerife, Spain) on different surfaces of the world, my baby – The Koga Miyata Worldtraveller – has naturally seen some changes over the years. Below is a somewhat detailed list of these changes.

    I’ve been riding my wonderful bike through 6 continents now, and I strongly believe that it’ll serve me all the way back to Denmark in 2010. I treat it like a woman, and I guess that’s why she’s put up with me for so long without any breakdowns…

    Here goes…

    I. Wheels

    Rear:
    1. Mavic EX 721. Lasted 13.000 km (from Denmark to China). Small cracks in rim where spokes connect. Changed (to 2) in Kashgar, Western China.

    2. Giant (standard). Lasted 17.000 km (from China to Australia). 10 USD rim. Side walls totally worn. Changed (to 3) in Merimbula, Australia.

    3. No-name (double-walled from Taiwan). Lasted 23.000 km (from Australia to USA). New entire wheel, incl. Taiwanese hub. 110 AUD. Changed (to 4) in Montreal, Canada.

    4. WTB. So far 1.000 km (from Canada to Ghana). New entire wheel, in Shimano Deore hub. 110 USD.

    Front:
    1. Mavic EX 721. Lasted 53.000 km (from Denmark to USA). Changed (to 2) in Wilmington, USA. Incredible durability.

    2. Sun Rim Rhyno Light. So far 3.000 km (from USA to…). New entire wheel, incl. Shimano Deore LX hub. 60 USD (special discount).

    II. Tyres

    Rear:

    1. Continental Travel Contact. Lasted 12.000 km (from Denmark to Uzbekistan).

    2. Schwalbe Marathon XR. Lasted 14.000 km (from Uzbekistan to Australia).

    3. Schwalbe Marathon XR. Lasted 8.500 km (from Australia to New New Zealand).

    4. Specialized. Lasted 7.500 km (from New Zealand to Ecuador).

    5. Schwalbe Marathon Extreme. Lasted 8.000 km (from Ecuador to USA).

    6. Bontrager. Lasted 1.500 km (from Florida to North Carolina, USA), but was changed before worn out, free of charge.

    7. Bontrager. So far 3.000 km (from North Carolina, USA to Ghana)

    Front:

    1. Continental Travel Contact. Lasted 13.000 km (from Denmark to Kyrgyzstan)

    2. Schwalbe Marathon XR. Lasted 31.000 km (from Kyrgyzstan to Peru). Unbeatable durability.

    3. Schwalbe Marathon
    Extreme
    . So far 14.000 km (from Peru to Ghana). No flats until now. Knock-on-wood.

    III. Cables

    Gear cables:
    1. A welder in Turkey broke a gear cable trying to weld my (alu!) bottle holder.
    2. Same cable changed in Chiang Rai, Thailand (not broken, but hard to use).
    3. Changed again in Santiago, Chile (not broken, but hard to use).

    Brake cables:
    No replacement.

    All cables have been cleaned and oiled a few times at bike shops when I had to make major repairs on the bike anyway.

    IV. Chains.

    All in all, after 56.500 km on the bike (3.500 km on pre-WT trips), I’m on my 9th chain.

    I’ve used Shimano HG93 (27 speed) several times, which is my favourite. This chain normally last 8.000-14.000 km.

    Due to lack of HG93-availability, I’ve used the weaker Shimano HG53 twice. They’ve lasted from 5.000-7.000 km.

    I’ve used a SRAM chain once. It lasted around 8.000 km. Am carriyng an extra SRAM chain in Africa now.

    V. Cassette

    1. Lasted 5.000 km. Changed a little pre-mature in Hungary.

    2. Lasted 16.000 km. Changed in Singapore.

    3. Lasted 14.000 km. Changed in Santiago, Chile.

    4. Lasted 19.000 km. Changed in Wilmington, USA.

    5. So far just 1.000 km….

    VI. Front chain rings.

    1. Middle ring changed in Singapore after 21.000 km.

    2. Middle ring changed again in Medellin, Colombia after 23.000 km.

    3. Small ring changed in Medellin, Colombia after 44.000 km.

    4. Big ring not changed (but sort of needs replacement)

    VII. Saddle

    1. My beloved Brooks leather saddle served me for 54.000 km. I changed it (slightly heart-broken) in Wilmington, USA ‘cos I got a great deal for a new one, and the leather had started tearing apart around the bolts. (Never mind, it took more than 5.000 km to sort of break it in to the shape of my ass).

    2. The transition to my new saddle (an aerodynamic, non-leather one with an ergonomic whole in the center of the saddle. June 2009) has been acceptable, but not painless.

    VIII. Tubes + flat tyres.

    I’m not counting the number of tubes I’ve used, but I reckon around 20-25, in total.

    Likewise, I don’t know how many flat tyres I’ve had. Around 30, I guess. Mostly on the rear tyre where most of the weight is.

    At the moment I haven’t had a flat tyre in the front for a whopping 14.000 km, thanks to a) Schwalbe’s ironwall tyres, and – to a lesser degree – b) to my carefulness and near-constant visual nails-on-the-road scanning.

    IX. Bike Shoes.

    1. Diadora shoes. 60 USD. Lasted 52.000 km (minus a few thousand km of flip-flop cycling in Asia). They were a very trusty, if smelly and worn, set of friends to me. RIP in Wilmington, USA.

    2. New Shimano RT51 shoes. So far 3.000 km and feeling great.

    X. Brakes

    No replacement or problems whatsoever.

    XI. Brake pads.

    Naturally, I’ve changed the brake pads numerous times. Approx. 6-7 times on rear, 4-5 times on front. I remember a steep decent in heavy rain in Turkey near Posof and the Georgian border that almost wore out a set of front brake pads from all the braking in rain. Changing pads is a 5 minute operation.

    XII. Bottom Bracket.

    1. The original lasted 28.500 km and was changed in Melbourne, Australia.

    2. The second one lasted 26.000 km and was changed in Montreal, Canada.

    3. I don’t expect another chance before I reach Denmark in 2010.

    XIII. Head set.

    Cleaned and re-greased in Singapore, after 22.000 km.

    XIV. Pedals.

    No replacement. Just occasional oil-drops.


    XV. Frame.

    No fiddling, welding or problems at all. It’s a Koga Miyata goddammit!

    The frame has some strange surface freckles around the holes where the bottles are attached, probably due to a lot of salty sweat from me dripping on those parts. It’s only cosmetical. But the Koga is still a beauty!


    XVI. Racks.

    The Tubus bike racks have done an amazing and impeccable job. No break-downs, weldings etc. Super strong and reliable.


    XVII. Handle bar

    Still the original butterfly multi-grip handle bar. I absolutely love it, not least because of the 5-6 layers of handle bar tape/duct tape/sports tape that I’ve put on it to get a super firm and fat grip. People are ofter astounded by the thickness of the handle bar. It’s my primary showing-off part on the bike.


    XVIII. Kick stand

    The bike came with a Pletscher kick stand (in center of bike), and I use it all the time. Additionally, the bike came with a front kick stand (mounted on front rack) that I never used, and after travelling with it for 50.000 km (extra dead weight!), I finally had it removed in Montreal, Canada.


    NB: This bike maintenance page (the above part) was made on my laptop 11 kilometers above ground level, on my way from Boston, USA to Accra, Ghana in a Boeing 747, operated by Lufthansa.

    *****************************************

    Bicycle gear:

    Brand Koga Miyata
    Model Worldtraveller 2004
    Weight 15,7kg
    Frame size 54 cm
    Frame Hand-built 26″ frame. Alu
    Front Fork Alloy Wide Bone integrated
    Color Dark titanium brush
    Handlebar ITM Freetime Multigrip 53 Black
    Stem ITM Trekking CNC Adj. ø22,2 Black “three bolts”
    Grips Koga Foam
    Brake Shimano Deore XT BR-M760
    Shift/Brake lever Shimano Deore XT ST-M760
    Headset Cane Creek A-head ZS-2 industrial-bearing 1″ Black
    Chain Shimano CN-HG73 108 links
    Front Hub Shimano Deore XT HB-M760 Black 36H 100mm
    Rear Hub Shimano Deore XT FH-M760 Black 36H 135mm
    Tyres Continental TravelContact 47-559
    Rims Mavic EX 721 559×21 36H CD “single eyelet”
    Spokes Sapim Leader Black
    Saddle Brooks Conquest Black
    Seat Post Kalloy SP-368 “double bolts” ø31,4x250mm Black
    Crankset Shimano Deore XT FC-M760 44x32x22T with chainguard
    Pedals Shimano PD-M324
    CassetteX Shimano CS-HG70 9-speed 11-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32T
    Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore XT RD-M760-SGS
    Front Derailleur Shimano Deore XT FD-M760 T-swing ø34,9 66-69
    Pump Topeak Roadmorph Small
    Bottle Zefal 137 Alloy Brushed 2x
    Bottle Holder Elite Macan Black 2x
    Bell Koga Widek Compact-II Silver
    Mudguards SKS P-50 Titan
    Headlight Cateye HL-EL110 Black/Brightled
    Rear light B&M D-Toplight senso incl. 4 dioden
    Low-rider Tubus
    Kickstand Pletscher Optima 1/260 Titan
    Ring lock AXA SL-7 titan
    Saddlebag Koga

    Camping gear:

    Ortlieb Front-Roller Classic Invaluable, waterproof panniers and a must for every long distance cyclist
    Ortlieb Back-Roller Classic The panniers are light weight and seemingly unbreakable!
    Ortlieb Rack-Pack I use this all-purpose bag for tent, mattress and sleeping bag on top of the back panniers. Waterproof and very solid built!
    MSR Wind 2 Expedition Tent
    Ortlieb Inflatable Sleeping Mat
    Haglöfs Hypna 1200 Sleeping bag
    Utensils Plastic knife, fork and my favourite steel spoon!
    Haglöfs Pillow This is a kind of luxury but highly valued!
    Petzl Tikka Head light Also used as the front light on my bike (Nicolai)
    Ortlieb Water Bowl, foldable, 10L Haven’t used this one very much as I normally just was my clothes in the shower or in the sink
    MSR XGK Expedition multifuel burner Very reliable and powerful this aggregate is one of the most important for kick-starting the day (couldn’t live without that morning coffee!)
    1 MSR pots and pans set, teflon Pan, 1,0 + 1,5 L pot
    Renajs AB lunch box Incl. spice box, 2 plates, 1 cup, 1 meassure cup
    Food, coffee, tea and spices I try always to be wellstocked on these things
    MSR Multifuel bottle The bottle contains 1 L which lasts for a coupple of weeks. Very good!
    Haglöfs Water Proof Bag For clothes and other stuff

    Electronics:

    Archos AV 500 Mobile Digital Video Recorder Hard drive for MP3s, photos, movies, sound recording
    Canon EOS 300D SLR (primary)
    Sony Cyber-shot T9 (slim pocket model, secondary)
    Canon Ultrasonic 75-300mm
    Canon EFS 18-55mm
    Canon 50mm (fixed)
    1 GB memory cards for each digital camera
    Sony ECM-DS70P Microphone For perfect sound recording
    Sundance Solar Panel Solar Energy Still waiting for this little wonder!
    Lowe camera bag
    Canon and Sony battery chargers
    Cardreader For transferring photos from memorycard to Archos hard drive
    2 sets of headphones
    iPod Video 60 GB Enogh capacity for 10500 songs! A true piece of genius!
    Universal plug-in adaptor
    Tripod for camera
    Circular polarization filter To make that sky seem so nice and blue!
    1 extra battery for both cameras
    Extra memory cards 256 MB and a tiny 32 MB
    Cables for photo transferring

    Personal stuff:

    Toiletries Tooth brush and paste, deo, perfume, shampoo, shower gel, face cream, body cream, sun cream, razor + blades, hair wax, mirror, dental floss, condoms, lip balm, “nail cutter”, ear plugs, cotton buds
    Medicine and first aid Body thermometer (digital), penicillin/antibiotics, Mepyramin (insect bites and itching), pain killers, Micropur water purifying tablets, Imodium, antihistamine, Fucidin (against infections), whistle, first aid band
    Moneybelt (from my first big tour in 1996) Driving licence, passport, diving certificate, travel insurance papers, passport sized photos, student ID (!), int. phone card, cash (local currency and USD), credit cards (Visa + Master), photocopies (and Gmail scans) of all documents
    Diverse Toilet paper, pencil case, washing powder (in empty 500ml bottle), plastic bags, WT visit cards, Moleskine diaries (9×14 cm, ruled), paper, maps, 1-2 guidebooks, Sudoku, other litterature, sports tape, swiss army knife, purse, lighter, sunglasses
    Vaccinations Yellow fever, Hepatitis A, Typhoid, Polio, Diphtheria, Tetanus, Rabies. We both have the yellow fever, Hep. A, Tetanus and Polio vacc. from earlier travels thus saving lots of money. Nicolai (a.k.a. Ace Ventura – the Pet Detective) didn’t go for the rabies vaccine.

    Clothing:

    1 pair of Fleece gloves Probably won’t need these for a while!
    1 pair of Specialized Sub Zero gloves Wind and water proof with removable inner glove. Will definitely not need those in the Turkmenistan desert
    Sweat band Mode a’la Bjorn Borg
    Haglöfs Dual Jacket Fleece Polartec Mid-layer, often used in the evenings
    1 set of thermo underwear
    Norrona Falketind Rain Jacket Goretex, fantastic finish and quality!
    Norrona Falketind Rain Trousers Goretex, super high quality
    Norrona Amundsen M’s Cotton Anorak Windproof, relaxed clothing
    Norrona Offtrack M’s Jersey Used when cycling. Very good and aggressive on sweat!
    Norrona Offtrack M’s Tee-Shirt Ditto, short version
    1 pair Sealskinz wind and waterproof socks Long model
    1 pair Sealskinz wind and waterproof socks Short model
    2 pairs Sealskinz Thermal Liner Socks Very comfy
    2 pair X-Socks Cycling Socks Short model
    2 pairs Biemme Cycling Shorts I’ve had a few probs with an aching crotch..Hmm
    5 pairs of underwear Dark coloured
    1 pair of jeans Not very practical but great for off-bike city cruising
    Nike Air Perseus training shoes For running and time off-bike
    Teva Terra sandals Solid and very comfortable sandal – very versatile
    Sarong For beach bumming and cover in hot climates. Bought in thailand in 1996. Very worn out!
    Shorts Brazilian made and multi-purpose: Off-bike, on-bike, swimming
    Tatonka Travel Towel Micro Small sized, fast drying
    Hat Cap for sun protection

    Toolkit:

    Repair Multitool, puncture repair kit, pump, cabel ties
    Other Gaffa tape, spare brake pads, wire lock

    Miscellaneous:

    Ortlieb Document Bag Waterproof see-through bag for cash, passport etc.
    Common Safety whistles, dental floss, sun cream, sun block for lips, fishing line, playing cards,


    PHOTO SECTION OF BIKE BAG CONTENT:

    Before you proceed, I warmly recommend you check out these photos in the Flickr album I’ve made. The photos contain small descriptive notes (that don’t show up in the photos below) in semi-hidden boxes on the individual photos.

    Just read the comment in the left-hand box and follow the description.

    See Equipment List on Flickr


    Front pannier, right side:

    WT EQP: Front pannier, right side.

    WT EQP: Bike parts

    WT EQP: Plastic box (front/right pannier) with miscellaneous stuff

    WT EQP: Plastic box (front/right pannier) with miscellaneous stuff


    Front pannier, left side:

    WT EQP: The Laptop

    WT EQP: The Paper Matters

    Rear pannier, right side:

    WT EQP: Clothes (mostly right/back pannier)

    WT EQP: Spare tyres, tubes, tools, bike parts.

    WT EQP: Spare parts, medication, tools etc.

    WT EQP: The Toilet Bag

    Rear pannier, left side:

    WT EQP: Stuff sack with socks and gloves etc.

    WT EQP: Miscellaneous

    WT EQP: The Gadgets

    WT EQP: Chords, extra batteries, internet cable etc.

    …and all this goes into this…

    WT EQP: Chords, extra batteries, internet cable etc.


    On top of rear panniers:

    WT EQP: Camping stuff (back of bike)

    WT EQP: The Gadgets


    The Handle Bar Bag:

    WT EQP: The Handle Bar Bag

    The Bags:

    WT EQP: The Panniers (bike bags)

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